• Annie Banks

The Best of Modern Netflix Horror

It seems that the current state of the world is something out of a horror film itself. While we're bracing for the next scare in real-time, there are some fictional frights that can be found on Netflix to keep us busy.

Hannibal is a modern take on a classic Cassanova cannibal that can chill any spine. Though Anthony Hopkins may have set the tone for the serial killer's adaptation, Mads Mikkelson shines in this critically adored NBC series. The take on Thomas Harrison's novels twists the cat-and-mouse psychologically thrilling game into a dark, grotesque, and truly morbid comedic horror.

Vampires may be a staple to Romania and its culture, and Dracula is just as sought after in modern media as he was upon his origins. Universal may be gearing up to revisit the famed, fanged fiend, but that doesn't diminish Dracula - a BBC mini-series from Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss. Moffat and Gatiss are no strangers for producing lengthy series in great detail, and Dracula sinks its teeth into three 90-minute long episodes per season, without draining the life from itself.

The Walking Dead may be dead tired of itself and its zombified plot. The Black Summer, a spin-off of Syfy's Z Nation, brings a series centric on zombies back from the dead by taking a whole new approach. Valuing style over substance, The Black Summer gambles on the long haul of dealing with life after the apocalypse.

Castlevania takes a bite out of horror through anime which generously bleeds with quality true to the video game series. Banding together vampire-hunting heroes, Castlevania draws its influences from its third game on the NES. Suave in style, this Netflix original is no Twilight and is more of an intensifying and perturbing series that grows all the more bizarre.

Anime, much like Castlevania, takes on horror with a heavy hand. Devilman Crybaby spins the sinister manga into a modern, unnervingly violent, and truly disturbing series for Netflix. After a young teen is taken over by a blood-lusting demon, a pitch-black anime weaves itself into a darker and more unforgiving nightmare.

Presenting itself as a prequel to Psycho, Bates Motel breaks down the origins of Norman Bates, his disturbed mother, and the sorrowful fate of tragedy and murder to follow. Carefully beading together clever foreshadowing and subplots to make your skin crawl, Bates Motel is a frighteningly fun forerunner to a classic horror icon.

Setting out a new series of horrors to terrorize the United States each season, American Horror Story is not to be snubbed. Outlandishly eerie and intoxicatingly macabre, this horror series is sensibly scary while switching up its characters, all with the same cast, to an entertaining degree. Strangely fascinating and truly dedicated to its ghastly appeal, American Horror Story is unlike any other televised horror series.

Ash vs. Evil Dead, in all of its campy gory glory, has dignified itself as a cult classic for horror fans as Sam Raimi's decades-old series sails to the top in triumph. Bruce Campbell has secured himself as a star as Ash Williams, despite the series seeing its end after the third season. A comically freakish prototype, Ash vs. Evil Dead will never die - even when dealing with the undead.


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